Let Get Flicked

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What is a Fuzzball?


  • One question I hear more than any other is What's a Fuzzball??" Allow me to explain:

    A Fuzzball is a 30-year-old fallen debutante who lives in Houston, TX with a bossy dog and an even bossier parrot who she SWEARS is the reincarnation of Napoleon Bonaparte.

    A Fuzzball prefers animals to most people, because people can really suck sometimes.

    A Fuzzball loves music, ALL music ALL of the time. If she's not listening to it, then she's singing it.

    A Fuzzball has a mad love for all things British, especially their actors.

    A Fuzzball is blissfully happy in a bookstore, preferably one with good music playing in the background. If you look under a Fuzzball's bed you'll usually find an entire library of books that she has dropped there after falling asleep reading.

    Fuzzballs are usually incurable romantics, ridiculously optimistic, and bent on making the world a happier place.

    Your typical Fuzzball will probably have a completely bizarre sense of humor. Just go with it, it will take you to funny places.

    You should also be aware that Fuzzballs are giant nerds. Seriously. Science fiction, computers, the whole shebang.

    Fuzzballs are also budding photographers. They love looking at the world through a lens and finding new ways to be creative.

    Oh...and you can also look for a Fuzzball in one of the best movies ever made. ;)

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Comments

Jennifer

Thanks for the tip. I posted my results too, and gave you a shout-out. :)

Gymshoes

I like the way you've combined categorizations using both bold and strikeout for books you've read but wouldn't touch with a 10 foot pole. LOL! There are a handful on that list that I've read but wished I hadn't! ;-) I also like the commentary you've added. I think part of the reason why this list is such a combination of popular fiction and classics is because it's not just about what you've read, but how you feel about both popular fiction and classics.

BadAunt

I thought of doing it too, but then realized there were several on that list that I MIGHT have read, they seem vaguely familiar, I remember the covers, I think I had them here at some point ... but they've left an indelible blank in my mind. Which means either I read them and hated them, read them and liked them but not enough to remember them, or read them in the year or so after a head injury, when I read a lot to distract myself from pain. At that time getting involved in a book - or in anything - really hurt, so I was reading in a sort of distant way.

It all makes the meme a bit DIFFICULT.

Incidentally, I can assure you that "A Fine Balance" is WELL worth reading - I adored it. (I've since read a lot of Mistry's books.) So is "She's Come Undone," which I remember I didn't expect to like but ended up recommending to all my friends until they read it to shut me up (and then agreed with me). And "Ender's Game" is a classic - The Man found it for me in a second-hand bookstore, and urged me to read it. After I finished it I was amazed that I'd never heard of it before, and then went on to read the rest of the Ender novels.

bombadil

Thanks, I think I am going to post this, but it needs to be revised a little bit. Putting 4 Tolkien books or 5 Rowlings really doesn't make sense. If you have read one, you probably read the others.

There shouldn't be more than 1 from any one author.

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